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Responding To Bloggers Who Forget To Give You Attribution

How to get blogger attribution when credit is due

I know nothing we put out on the internet is totally protected. And I’m sure many of you have had this same thing happen to you where someone posts your content with little or no attribution. Frankly speaking, it can be frustrating because you work hard on creating your content and want attribution where deserved. However, innocent mistakes happen, so before you get all bent out of shape, pause, and have a conversation.

This evening I had a Twitter follower post my content from my blog (7 Things Restaurants Can Talk About On Facebook or Twitter Besides Themselves) on his Facebook page.

I came upon it accidentally when I was viewing another Twitter follower’s wall.

And there it was:

The title looked awfully familiar since I wrote a blog post just like it days before. However, I didn’t see any attribution in the tweet so I clicked on the Facebook link and that brought me to here:

He mentioned my name, albeit with no link to my own Facebook page and no link to the blog.  Which explained why at first I was a little perplexed as to why there was no photo rendering in his post; but without a link it makes senses there wouldn’t be a photo. And I wondered what could possibly be behind “Continue Reading…” so I clicked that link and found this:

Instead of linking to my blog post or to my own Facebook page or tagging me, which is what I would have preferred, he copied and pasted the blog post into his own Page’s status update and then tweeted it out to promote his own Facebook Page.

My one friend said, “Well it’s not plagiarism; at least he mentioned you.” Another friend said, “Maybe he doesn’t know how to use Facebook all that well or doesn’t know how to tag other pages.”

I never believe in having arguments over social media. It’s a social atmosphere, can’t we all just get along and have conversations like real humans? So I decided to send him back a polite tweet:

And he was a total stand-up guy about it. He not only updated the post to reflect a link back to my Facebook page, but he also replied via Twitter, which I thought was super cool and really appreciated. Here’s his reply:

But, can you imagine how ugly this could have gotten if I hadn’t reached out to him or he hadn’t been such a reasonable guy? And for what? Over a little link juice? C’mon we all have better things to argue over and remember that social media is all about having conversations.

For more on this topic, you might want to read HubSpot’s Blog post: How To Not Steal People’s Content On The Web

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About Tracy Sestili

Tracy Sestili is CEO and Chief blogger at Social Strand Media. She is also the author of Taking Your Brand from the Bench to the Playing Field -- Social Media Fundamentals for Business.