Google+

Social Recruiting Pitfalls When Using Social Media

social recruitingEvery recruiter wants to find the best talent and social recruiting has a lot of benefits. It’s a great way to connect and find out more about top candidates during the vetting and interview process. However, it’s not meant to be a replacement to your acquisition strategy, but rather another tool in your recruitment arsenal.

Candidate Search

Social recruiting does allow you to find candidates that you may not have otherwise found. But it’s not 100% inclusive of all top talent. Although LinkedIn may be the social network of choice for most Americans looking for a professional white-collar job (24% U.S. & 30% worldwide prefer social networks when searching for a job, source Kelly Services Inc) , only 21% of people on LinkedIn have their profiles set up for job search. Most people aren’t actively looking and if they are, haven’t updated their profile to be optimized for job search. You should expand your social recruiting net to other social networks like Facebook, Twitter, Vizualize.me or About.me.

Disparity

Additionally, when you’re looking for top talent, you need to understand which demographics are on which social networks. For example, 12.8% of the population is African American, but only 5% have a professional profile on LinkedIn. The same goes for Hispanic profiles, only 2% of LinkedIn members are Hispanic versus 15.4% of the total population (source: Quantcast). So while although LinkedIn is a great social network for professionals, it’s also missing out on some great talent and could put your organization at risk for lawsuits due to discrimination of race or age.

Screening

Lastly, when screening candidates and perusing their social media profiles you need to make sure that personal information that the candidate posts, such as religious or sexual preference, family situations, or social activities such as drinking, are not weighed into the decision process. Your decision needs to be based on assessments, skills, or tests so that it’s not perceived as discrimination.

All that being said, while the legal risks are real, social networks can help you form a dialogue with potential candidates and let candidates get to know your brand. Remember, interviewing is a two-way street.

 

Send to Kindle
About Tracy Sestili

Tracy Sestili is CEO and Chief blogger at Social Strand Media. She is also the author of Taking Your Brand from the Bench to the Playing Field -- Social Media Fundamentals for Business.

Comments

  1. If I were to recruit someone from social media, Facebook is also important to look at. I would rather get a person who parties hard but also works hard and is loved by his or her friends.
    This is good for office camaraderie. We have to see beyond the wine glasses and beer cans.
    If some people don’t want their personal lives to be discovered by their future employers, they should change their emails and names on social media.

  2. Hi Tracy, thanks for the good article. However I would disagree on this:

    >>Lastly, when screening candidates and perusing their social media profiles you need to make sure that personal information that the candidate posts, such as religious or sexual preference, family situations, or social activities such as drinking, are not weighed into the decision process.

    In a small company like mine, every employee becomes very tightly integrated with everyone else, and it would be impossible to ignore their personal traits, values and habits. So when recruiting, I have to screen candidates for their lifestyle – I do not want my other people suffer from the one who will not fit the team culturally, do I?

    Of course it might be completely different in a big company, I suppose.

    • Tracy Sestili says:

      Hi Natalie – you can do that as long as you don’t say that’s why they were declined. Otherwise it falls under discrimination and your company could get sued. That’s really my only point.