Small Business Social Media Lessons: Missed Opportunities on Social Media

There’s a good reason why developing a social media strategy is one of the first things you do in your social media planning efforts. The strategy helps you plan and set up guidelines and procedures. Recently I taught a class and one of the students showed me tweets she was doing at work for her company. The tweet went something like this:

[Her company] partners up with [another company] to provide 12,000 meals to local families in the Boston Area.

but, it could’ve read…

We’re excited to partner up with @partnercompany to provide 12,000 meals to local families in Boston Area.

But there was a missed opportunity here, do you know what it was? Let me show you with a real life example.

Example #1:

Here is a tweet from Economic Times where they use a hashtag to describe their partner Singapore Airlines.

Small Biz Faux Pas

However, it would have been better to take the 5 seconds to look up their Twitter handle and tagged them in the tweet with a dot in front of Singapore Airline’s handle so that their tweet would have reached a potential 56K more eyeballs. And, there’s a good chance that Singapore Airlines would have retweeted it too.

How it should have been: “.@SingaporeAir is a dream partner Nirmalya Kumar, Director, #Tata Sons http://ow.ly/pMyfP 

Now one would think that Singapore Airlines is probably monitoring their brand enough to know when anyone puts their name in a hashtag, but surprisingly, most brands don’t.

SingaporeAir

 

 

Example #2:

Now, if you’re going to tag another company’s handle in a tweet, then definitely make sure you get their @handle right and not make the mistake like this gaming expo did with Cards Against Humanity game. Many small businesses don’t have the blue check mark verification next to their name, so it takes a few seconds to look at their account to determine if it’s really them. Usually you can tell just by looking at some of their tweets and their follower count.

(Luckily in this case @CAH was monitoring imposter accounts as well as their brand name, but most small businesses don’t do that due to not investing in the right monitoring tools).

CAH_Twitter

 

 

 

About Tracy Sestili

Tracy Sestili is CEO and Chief blogger at Social Strand Media. She is also the author of Taking Your Brand from the Bench to the Playing Field -- Social Media Fundamentals for Business.